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Alcoholic Anonymous

Does Alcoholic Anonymous (AA) work?

How many times have you felt lost, hopeless or defeated? As someone who has a problem with alcohol, you may always wish to move to sobriety, but temptations and triggers may seem to hold you back.

Here at Castle Craig, we know how important peer-to-peer support can be in the recovery process and actively encourage this in our alcohol rehab facility in Scotland.

However useful AA can be for individuals struggling with alcohol, we always recommend the intervention of medical professionals to guide you safely through the psychological and physical aspects of the disease.

Call our 24-hour helpline 01721 728118 to speak to discuss the type of treatments available to you. 

About AA meetings

Alcoholics Anonymous is free and widely available, with over 118,000 chapters worldwide.

AA follows the same principles as 12-Step alcohol rehab programmes, offering an opportunity to continue building on the work you completed in treatment.

Here at Castle Craig, we usually host onsite AA meetings in West Linton.

Advantages  of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)

AA sponsorship and community support can serve as healthy counterpoints to alcohol-based friendships and strained family dynamics.

  • Learn from others’ experiences
  • Feel less isolated and alone
  • Allows you to share and open up, breaking down the barriers of guilt and shame
  • Reinforces your efforts towards sobriety
  • Provides a refuge to turn to when facing periods of emotional instability

Disadvantages

While AA is a beneficial component of the recovery journey for alcohol addiction, it’s not often a permanent substitute for personalised therapy.

AA doesn’t provide the same level of intensiveness or individualised care found in more structured alcohol rehab programmes, and its open format means anyone can attend, regardless of how they affect the group dynamic.

While most modern AA groups have adapted to be more secular, some may struggle with the emphasis on spirituality and ‘higher power’.

Who is Alcoholic Anonymous good for?

Alcoholics Anonymous is recommended to everyone recovering from alcohol addiction as a continuing part of recovery practice.

People typically begin attending meetings while in primary treatment and continue their attendance indefinitely as a way to support lifelong recovery.

If you have any questions about these treatment options, our admissions counsellors are standing by to help you make an informed decision. Contact us now. 

Alcoholics Anonymous Meetings Near Me

AA operates in all local areas so that once you leave alcohol rehab you can begin to attend your local community Alcoholics Anonymous Meetings near you. There are usually several meetings to choose from in cities and a weekly meeting in smaller towns. 

Resources

  • The Big Book; A link to downloadable chapter PDFs from the US AA website. Find out more
  • If you do need help or if you’d just like to talk to someone about your drinking, call AA on 0800 9177 650 or email us at help@aamail.org

Get in touch today

If you need emergency mental health advice or medical support please call the NHS 24 helpline as soon as possible on 111. The advice is free and could save your life.

If you need advice on accessing rehab treatment for addictions, please call our 24-Hour Rehab Helpline on 01721 728118 to arrange a free addiction assessment or click here for more information.

You’ll be glad you did.

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Page last reviewed and medically fact-checked | September 9, 2021